37 thoughts on “Player movements so far this offseason

    • Hmm…maybe Calhoun instead of Verdugo? Hate to lose Alvarez, but guessing that White Sox would want our number 1, even if he is several years off.

      • I have a hard time wrapping my mind around one player being worth that many players. Sale has to be enough better than De Leon that Verdugo, De Leon, Alvarez, and Verdugo fits into the gap.

        Alvarez could be as good as Sale in three years, or not. Puig could be the MVP next year, or not. I agree about swapping Calhoun for Verdugo as with Puig gone, the Dodgers will need Verdugo in RF.

        I assume the Dodgers would want White Sox’ closer only if they lose Jansen otherwise maybe they could substitute Oaks for Alvarez but I suppose Alvarez has already put himself on all GMs radar.

        • Basically, it’s a trade of two guys from the Sox that are proven and can contribute now (and for a few more years) for unproven players that may or may not pan out, so the more the merrier from teh Sox perspective. I wouldn’t have too much confidence in Robertson as our closer. More like an overpriced ($12 million) set up guy.

        • Losing Puig would leave a hole that Verdugo couldn’t fill for a couple of years, so FO would need to fill that now.

  1. I expect that the Giants, given all their problems with the closer in 2016, would offer the moon to Jansen. Losing him would be bad enough, but losing him to the Giants would be awful.

    • I suppose the obvious question is: What if the two teams playing in the World Series have the same regular season record? Also, if Team A won their division while Team B didn’t but had a better regular season record than Team A – who gets home field?

  2. Here’s an overall view of the new CBA with a pertinent sentence or two.

    …MLB will not see a sudden explosion of gargantuan multi-year deals for
    free agents, particularly the mid-tier players. That’s especially true
    when you consider that the league’s two richest teams—the Dodgers and
    Yankees—are still far above the luxury tax limits. Getting below that
    $195 million figure will reset the penalty rates that each team is
    paying—since each is a repeat violator of the luxury tax, Los Angeles
    and New York pay the maximum 50% tax—but that will take some time and
    work by both teams, likely keeping them from making any big splashes
    this off-season or next.